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  Unusual and Funny Street Names
  • Awesome Street, Cary, North Carolina - In 2009 Paul Scandariato was building a new house and when filing building permits he tried for the name Sesame Street for the private road. But, that turned out to be already taken in his county, so he requested to name it Untitled Road, but city officials said that would be too confusing for emergency responders. His 3rd try was Awesome Street, which was rejected the first few times for being too silly, but eventually approved.

  • Bucket of Blood Street, Holbrook, Arizona - In the 1880's, the town was full of outlaws, cowboys, and crime. In 1886, a poker gamer gone bad (or some say the argument was over stolen horses) at Terrill’s Cottage Saloon caused a barroom brawl that ended in murder. One of the men involved in the fight was Grat Dalton of the notorious Dalton Gang, who shot and killed 2 men, spilling what townsfolk considered to be a bucket of blood. Soon after the bar officially took that as its name. The bar eventually closed but the street where it was located still has that name.

  • Chicken Dinner Road, Caldwell, Idaho - Morris B. and Laura Lamb, who lived on this road, were close friends of Idaho Governor C. Ben Ross and his wife, and Laura invited them to dinner. Laura was known for her fried chicken, apple pie and hot rolls. She mentioned to the Governor that her road was full of pot holes and not graded, and the Governor said "Laura, if you get that road graded and graveled, I'll see to it it's oiled." Local officials agreed to do the work, and the day after it was done the Governor fulfilled his end of the bargain. But, right away vandals painted the words, "Lamb's Chicken Dinner Avenue," in big, bright yellow letters on the freshly-oiled road. Kids on the school bus started chanting "Chicken Dinner, Chicken Dinner," when they passed the house. This eventually became the official name of the road.

  • Wayne's World Drive, Draper, Utah - It was actually named after local farmer Wayne Ballard, by developer Terry Diehl who bought the farm land from Wayne and turned it into Corner Canyon Estates, located 20 miles southeast of Salt Lake City. It is also a play on the name of the Wayne's World movie of course.

  • Knightrider Street, London, England - This was not named after the David Hasslehoff TV show, it is said to be named after the route taken by knights on their journey from the Tower of London to Smithfield, to take part in tournaments, although some experts doubt this explaination of its origin. Also, Do-Little Lane is located nearby.

  • Booger Branch Road, Six Mile, South Carolina - Who picked this?

  • Old Guy Road, Queensbury, Bradford, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom - There is also one in Damon, Texas.

  • Flutie Pass, Natick, MA (near Boston) - Named for Doug Flutie, the New England Patriots quarterback, and his historic 1984 play against Miami. It is a short stretch of road connecting the Natick Mall and the Shoppers' World Mall.

  • I Dream of Jeannie Way, Cocoa Beach, Florida - An episode of the TV show was filmed in this town.

  • Electric Avenue - We're gonna rock down to...Westerville, Ohio

  • This Way, Lake Jackson, Texas - The town also has street names such as Any Way, That Way, Circle Way, Winding Way, His Way, and West Way. These confusing names were put in place by town planner Alden B. Dow, who was the son of Dow Chemical founder Herbert Henry.

  • ACDC Lane, Melbourne, Australia - Formerly called Corporation Lane (the generic name assigned to otherwise unnamed lanes in Melbourne), it was renamed in 2004 as a tribute to Australian rock band AC/DC. They could not use the band's trademark lightning bolt or slash ("/") because that would have been against the naming convention of the Office of the Registrar of Geographic Names.

  • Ha-Ha Road, London, England - A ha-ha is a trench-like boundry often found in commons and old country park gardens. It provides a physical barrier to keep livestock out of formal grounds while allowing uninterrupted views over a pastoral scene.

  • Justin Bieber Way, Forney, Texas - 11–year-old Caroline Gonzalez was mayor for a day (she won a competition on Facebook created to promote politics among young people), so she renamed part of Main Street after Justin Bieber, just for the day.

  • Warp Drive, Dulles, Virginia - The county changed the name from Steeplechase Drive at the request of Orbital Sciences Corp., who paid the $500 cost of the new street sign.

  • Butts Wynd, Scotland - The "Butts" part may have been named for a doctor of King Henry VIII, or for a lawyer of the same period. The word "wynd" (prounounced like ‘wined’) a narrow or winding lane or alley leading off a major thoroughfare.

  • Toe Jam Hill Road NE, Bainbridge Island, Washington - Nobody knows exactly how it got its name. It may have been named for a local settler with the name Torjam, or possibly for stumbling drunkards.

  • Shades of Death Road, New Jersey - A two-lane rural road of about 7 miles in length in central Warren County. There are several theories as to how it got its name: 1. Highwaymen or other bandits would supposedly lay in wait for victims in the tree shadows of an adjoining forest, then often cut their throats after taking what they had, or they would engage in fights to the death among themselves over women. 2. Locals would take revenge against these criminals by lynching them and leaving the bodies dangling from low-hanging tree branches as a warning to others criminally inclined. 3. In the 1920s and 1930s there were three brutal murders along the road. 4. Bear Swamp nearby was known as a place where packs of vicious wild cats lethally attacked travelers along the road. 5. In 1850, malaria-carrying insects were discovered nesting in a cliff face along the road. They flourished in the nearby wetlands of Bear Swamp, causing annual outbreaks of the disease and a high mortality rates due to the remoteness of the area, so in the spirit of black humor the name was changed from Shades Road (due to its tree cover) to Shades of Death Road.

  • Follow Thay Dream Parkway, Inglis, Florida - The name is taken from the title of an Elvis Presley movie that was filmed in nearby Yankeetown in 1961.

  • Jot-em-Down Road, Cumming, Georgia - It was named after a store that was once located there.

  • Psycho Path - Traverse City, Michigan.

  • Lois Lane - Franklin, North Carolina.

  • Divorce Court - Heather Highlands, Pennsylvania.

  • Cannibal Road, Utah. I stopped to eat at the restaurant there, but the waitress gave me the cold shoulder.

  • Farfrompoopen Road - Story, Arkansas.

  • Tater Peeler Rd. - Lebanon, TN.

  • Unexpected Road - Buena, NJ.

  • SqueezePenny Lane - McKinney, Texas.

  • Bossy Boots Drive - Allen, Texas.

  • Old Trash Pile Road - Henderson, Louisiana.

  • Malfunction Junction - Kingston, Arkansas.

  • Super Chicken Drive - Tucson, Arizona

  • Cat Rat Alley - Panama City, Florida.

  • This Ain’t It Road - Dadeville, Alabama.

  • Dutch Oven Ave. - Salem, Oregon.

  • Witts End Rd. - Andover, New Jersey.

  • Old Spit Rd. - Vancouver Island, Canada.

  • Twiggly Wiggly Road - Vancouver Island, Canada.

  • Boring Rd. - Decatur, GA

  • Corpse Way - Wakefield, England.

  • Fanny Hands Lane - UK

  • Dork Street - Pico River

  • ZZYZX Rd. - San Bernadino County, California.

  • Chicken Gristle Road - Granbury, Texas.

  • Pop Corn Road - Hendersonville, North Carolina.

  • Candy Cane Ln. - Yuma, Arizona.

  • Ice Cream St. - Shreveport, Louisiana.

  • Milky Way - Cupertino, California.

  • Yellow Yellow Circle - Middletown, Connecticut.

  • Parent’s Way - Bloomfield, CT.

  • Boy Street - Bristol, CT.

  • Sensible Spoonville Road - CT

  • North Pole Avenue - Old Lyme, CT

  • E Z Street - Westbrook, CT

  • Bread & Milk Street - Coventry, CT

  • Supreme Ct. - Leroy, Illinois.

  • Cake Street - England.

  • Crazy Lane - England.

  • Leg of Mutton Road - England.

  • Lickers Lane - England.

  • Silly Lane - England.

  • Squeeze Guts Alley - Truro, England.

  • Mount Misery Drive - Harbor, NY.

  • Zig Zag Road - England.

  • No Name Land - Philadelphia, PA.

  • Street Road - Bensalem, PA.

  • Jolly Road - Plymouth Meeting, PA.

  • Pansy Court - Bucks County, PA.

  • Quite A Rd. - Lovell, Maine.

  • Where O Where Dr. - Nantucket, Massachusetts.

  • Oh My God Rd. - Central City, Colorado.

  • Shades of Death Rd. - Great Meadows, NJ.

  • Upsan Downs Rd. ("Ups and Downs") - Wilmington, Delaware.

  • Why Worry Ln. - Phoenix, Arizona.

  • Tennis Court - Brooklyn, New York.

  • Life Rd. - Peru, Indiana.

  • Memory Lane - Prospect, Illinois.

  • Partridge & Pair Tree - Peoria, Illinois.

  • Bird-in-Bush Road - London, England.

  • Bleeding Heart Yard - London, England.

  • Friday Street - London, England.

  • Honeypot Lane - London, England.

  • Pope's Head Alley - London, England.

  • Shower Curtain Street - London, England.

  • Slim Bottoms Road - Mount Vernon, New York.

  • Elvis Alive Drive - Las Vegas, Nevada.

  • Cut Throat Lane - Swanmore, England.

  • Dead Man's Walk - Thornhill, England.

  • Drunk Horse Lane - Westcliff, Colorado.

  • Skunk's Misery Road - Lattington, New York

  • Captain Bacon Rd. - South Yarmouth, Massachusetts

  • Funtastic Drive - Cabot, Arkansas

  • PeePee Falls St. - Hilo, Hawaii

  • Shortcut Road - Pascagoula, Mississippi

  • AAAA Rd. - Australia.

  • Beer Cart Lane - Canterbury, UK

  • Mellow Days Drive - Pensacola, Florida.

  • Hillbilly Lane - Shenandoah, Virginia

  • Street Road - Pennsylvania

  • Hagg Lane - UK.

  • Westward Ho Road - Lake Oswego, Oregon.

  • Seldom Seen Rd. - Powell, Ohio.

  • Dead Cat Alley - Woodland, California.
Also, all of this may make you wonder what the difference between a street, road, avenue, boulevard, or lane is, so here's the answer:

Let me start by saying over the years, many of the naming conventions have become much less defined, so in many areas for example, street and road mean the same thing. But, here's a rough guide to it all:

Road - Runs between two different places, such as between two towns. They were originally built to replace railroads. On roads, you drive past things. A road is typically meant to efficiently move traffic. Nowadays highways are more like roads used to be.

Street - Within any city or town, you will find streets, which are a paved public path within a built up area. They usually connect buildings together and have street corners, stop signs, intersections, parking, and sometimes pedestrians and bicycles. They sometimes run East to West.

Avenue - A wide road or street with trees planted along both sides, generally of the same species for uniformity. Sometimes leads to the main part of an area or city or town, sometimes runs North to South.

Boulevard - A high capacity road that supports several lanes of traffic, usually with one road going one way and another road next to it going the other way. Sometimes has lanes for bicycles. They usually are landscaped with trees down the middle or on both sides.

Lane - A short, narrow road, linking two larger thoroughfares, usually lacking a median. USed to mean the rear access to properties.

Drive - A private, winding road.

Way - A small out of the way road.

Thruway - New York has a bunch of these. They are limited-access highways used for designed for fast travel from point A to point B. They have separate lanes for traffic getting on and off the exits.

Place/Court - A very small roadway that accesses either residential or commercial properties, usually with only one way in or out. Sometimes ends in a cul-de-sac or something similar.

Plaza/Square - A wide open space

Alley - A narrow path between buildings, sometimes too narrow to drive through.

Terrace - A street with a row of houses that are similar looking.

Highway - Connects multiple cities.

Beltway - A highway surrounding an urban area.

Interstate - Connects multiple states.

Turnpike - Part of a highway, usually with a toll and near a city.

Freeway/Expressway - Part of a highway with two or more lanes on each side. No tolls or intersections.

Parkway - A major public road that has traffic lights and is usually decorated.

Causeway - Combines roads and bridges, usually to cross a body of water.

Bypass - Passes around a populated area to divert traffic.

Rotary/Roundabout/Traffic Circle - A circle around a traffic island with multiple connecting routes

Circle - Usually circles around an area.

Grange - A road that runs through what used to be a farm.

Bay - A small road where both ends link to the same connecting road.

Crescent - A windy road with an S, U, or L like shape, that may come back out to the street it started from.

Trail - Near a wooded area.

Byway - A minor, out of the way road.

Run - Usually located near a stream or small body of water.

Point - Usually dead ends at a hill.

Crossing - Where two roads meet.

Drive - Connects several houses in a neighborhood

Chase - On land historically used as private hunting grounds.

Branch - Divides a road or area into multiple subdivisions.

Cove - A narrow road, sometimes sheltered, usually near a larger body of water or mountains.

Pike - Usually a toll road.

Esplanade - A long open, level area, usually a walking path near the ocean.

Square - An open area where multiple streets meet.

Landing - Usually near a dock or port.

Walk - Started as a walking path or sidewalk, later became a road.

Grove - Thickly sheltered by trees.